Decennial Program Outline

Decennial Day at SHEA Spring 2021Decennial WebinarsDecennial at ICPIC


Decennial Day at SHEA Spring 2021

Did you miss Decennial Day? No worries, you can still access the recordings. Register today and receive access to the SHEA Spring Platform to watch all the Decennial Day Session. You can also earn continuing educational credits. Recordings will be available until December 31, 2021.

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Decennial Day Sessions:

  • Opening Plenary: Combating Emerging and Enduring Pathogens including AMR: A focus on healthcare strategies
  • Data for action: The future of surveillance for healthcare-associated infections and antimicrobial resistance
  • Bugs Without Borders: Preventing Transmission in Healthcare
  • Innovation: Big ideas that will impact patient-care, HAI prevention, and AMR Containment
  • Closing Plenary: Preparing for the Next Decade of Progress

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Decennial Webinars

Date: June to September 2021
Location: Virtual Program
Platform: https://learningce.shea-online.org/content/decennial-2020-webinar-series

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Schedule at a Glance*

*Subject to Changes

Session TitleDateTime
History of Infection Control in Hospitals in the United StatesJune 28, 2021
1:00 – 2:00 p.m. ET
Knowing is Not Enough: Behavior Change to Translate Guidelines Into Practice July 23, 2021 1:00 – 2:00 p.m. ET
Regional Approaches to MDRO Infection Control: What, Why and How? July 30, 2021 12:00 – 1:15 p.m. ET
Waking up from the Nightmare (Bacteria): Lessons from the Global CRE Control Efforts August 5, 2021 12:00 – 1:30 p.m. ET
Healthcare Outbreak Response: Taking it to the Next Level August 11, 20213:30 – 5:00 p.m. ET
Diagnostic stewardship: the good, the bad, how to better define disease August 18, 20212:00 – 3:00 p.m. ET
Good, Better, Best: Moving the Bar on Infection Prevention and Control in Long Term Care TBD
Re-thinking Barrier Precautions TBD
Beyond AMR Surveillance: Adapting AMR surveillance to changing technology and prevention needs TBD
Impact of the environment on infection risk: Surfaces and the built healthcare environment TBD
Leveraging friends against foes: Use of microbial communities to prevent infection and transmission TBD

Session Information

Title: History of Infection Control in Hospitals in the United States
Speakers:

  • Robert Gaynes, MD, Emory University School of Medicine
  • Robert Weinstein, MD, Rush University Medical Center

Learning Objectives:

  1. Review the origins of infection control programs in the United States
  2. Discuss major milestones in the evolution of infection control programs in the United States

Title: Regional Approaches to MDRO Infection Control: What, Why and How?
Speakers:

  • What does patient sharing tell us about the epidemiology of MDROs?- Tjibbe Donker, PhD, University Hospital Freiburg
  • Real life Regional Interventions to Prevent MDRO transmission in the US: Project SHIELD Orange County- Susan Huang, MD, MPH University of California Irvine School of Medicine
  • Using patient sharing networks to guide public health surveillance and outbreak response- Rachel Slayton, PhD, MPH, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion

Learning Objectives:

  1. Discuss how patient sharing among healthcare facilities in the region can influence local MDRO epidemiology
  2. List impact or real life regional AMR interventions in California and Illinois
  3. Review how CDC is using patient sharing information to guide public health surveillance and outbreak response

Title: Diagnostic stewardship: the good, the bad, how to better define disease
Speakers:

  • Ordering/Pre-analytic interventions – Surbhi Leekha, MBBS, University of Maryland Baltimore
  • Processing/analytic improvements- Kaede Ota Sullivan, MD, Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University
  • Reporting/post-analytic techniques
  • Overview of principles and guided panel discussion- Daniel Morgan, MD, University of Maryland School of Medicine

Learning Objectives:

  1. Define basic concepts of diagnostic stewardship.
  2. Review current approaches to diagnostic stewardship.
  3. Identify concepts of diagnostic stewardship that could be applied to new tests or outside microbiology.

Title: Healthcare Outbreak Response: Taking it to the Next Level
Speakers:

  • Outbreak Response and Disclosure: The Public Health Perspective – Dawn Terashita, MD, MPH, Los Angeles County Department of Public Health
  • Toward Innovative Standardized Surveillance and Detection Strategies- Meghan Baker, MD, ScD, Harvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute
  • Healthcare Outbreaks: Public and Patient Notification – Ann-Christine Nyquist, MD, Children’s Hospital Colorado
  • The Meaning of Protecting Patients: Discussing Disclosure – Lisa McGiffert, Patient Safety Action Network

Learning Objectives:

  1. Summarize approaches to outbreak detection and response
  2. Discuss effective and meaningful public and patient disclosure

Title: Good, Better, Best: Moving the Bar on Infection Prevention and Control in Long Term Care
Speakers:

  • Setting the Bar: Current state of IPC in Long-term Care- Nimalie Stone, MD, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  • Raising the Bar: Strategies to promote IPC in Long-term Care – Susan Huang, MD, MPH, University of California Irvine School of Medicine & Patricia Stone, PhD, RN, Columbia School of Nursing

Learning Objectives:

  1. Identify nursing home staff and facility characteristics associated with greater IPC capacity
  2. Describe implementation strategies to move nursing homes from good to best in infection prevention
  3. Discuss the impact of academic and public health partnerships for supporting IPC efforts in nursing homes

Title: Re-thinking Barrier Precautions
Speakers:

  • Approaches to Standard Precautions: Universal gowns/gloves, universal gloving
  • Getting away from culture positivity: using clinical characteristics to determine patients who need enhanced barrier precautions – Mary-Claire Roghmann, MD, University of Maryland School of Medicine
  • Implementation challenges: lessons from the front line – Sarah Krein, PhD, RN, VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System and University of Michigan

Learning Objectives:

  1. Describe current approaches to standard precautions and adherence.
  2. Deliberate pros and cons of using microbiologic or clinical data to determine need for enhanced barrier precautions.
  3. Discuss challenges in implementation of standard and enhanced barrier precautions, including adherence.

Title: Knowing is Not Enough: Behavior Change to Translate Guidelines Into Practice
Speakers:

  • Implementation Science – Stephen Timmons, PhD, University of Nottingham
  • Human Factors Engineering – Nasia Safdar, MD, University of Wisconsin, Madison
  • Behavioral Economic – Sara Keller, MD, MPH, MS, Johns Hopkins University
  • Medical Sociology – Julia Szymczak, PhD, University of Pennsylvania

Learning Objectives:

  1. Identify the contribution of implementation science, human factors engineering, behavioral economics and medical sociology to advancing the knowledge-practice gap in infection prevention and antimicrobial stewardship
  2. Identify unanswered research questions related to these disciplines that need to be answered in the coming decade

Title: Waking up from the Nightmare (Bacteria): Lessons from the Global CRE Control Efforts
Speakers:

  • Southeast Asian and the CRE crisis – The Singapore Approach to understanding CPE and CRE – Kalisvar Marimuthu, MBBS, Tan Tock Seng Hospital
  • European Responses to CRE – Infection Control and Antimicrobial Stewardship – Diamantis Plachouras, MD, PhD, European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control
  • Dealing with CRE in India – Sanjeev Singh, MD, PhD, Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences
  • Containing CRE in the United States, Lessons from the past decade of the front lines – Alexander Kallen, MD, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Learning Objectives:

  1. Describe and review the epidemiology across the globe
  2. Identify and describe local, regional and national responses to the CRE/CPE crisis

Title: Beyond AMR Surveillance: Adapting AMR surveillance to changing technology and prevention needs
Speakers:

  • Defining the targets for surveillance and prevention of antimicrobial resistance – Rachel Smith, MD, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  • Experiences, challenges, and opportunities of implementing the WHO GLASS framework for AMR Surveillance in India
  • Successful implementation of novel antibiotic resistance diagnostics into AR surveillance strategies: what might a coordinated approach look like? – Nicholas Moore, MT(ASCP), PhD, Rush University Medical Center
  • The Evolution of Public Health Informatics is Transforming Surveillance for Antimicrobial Resistance: Lessons from the Field

Learning Objectives:

  1. Describe key targets in the continuum of surveillance of antimicrobial resistance and how tracking them informs public health
  2. Summarize the GLASS framework and the key challenges of using it for public health action as well as the opportunities it presents for enhanced AMR surveillance
  3. List novel technologies that will likely be routine over next 10 years in most clinical laboratories in developed countries and discuss their potential implications for surveillance programs.
  4. Discuss how US health departments are using electronically captured data on antimicrobial resistance, the challenges to using this data for surveillance and antibiograms, and the future vision offered by advances in informatics.

Title: Impact of the environment on infection risk: Surfaces and the built healthcare environment
Speakers:

  • The hospital microbiome: implications for environmental cleaning and disinfection
  • The evidence base for hospital cleaning/disinfection
  • How can you tell the environment is safe for patients? – Deverick Anderson, MD, MPH, Duke University Medical Center
  • Environmental cleaning in the future – Sujan Reddy, MD, MSC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Learning Objectives:

  1. Obtain updated information about the hospital microbiome and how it might affect the control of transmission of pathogens
  2. Assess the evidence for the impact of environmental cleaning and disinfection on hospital acquired infection risk
  3. Review new approaches for assessing whether environmental cleaning and disinfection have been adequate
  4. Consider the impact of hospital and equipment design on risk of HAIs.

Title: Leveraging friends against foes: Use of microbial communities to prevent infection and transmission
Speakers:

  • Preventing infections and transmission trough microbial communities – Alison Halpin, PhD, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  • Microbiome protectants, restoratives and therapeutics for treatment of infections – current evidence and future perspectives – Eric Pamer, MD, University of Chicago
  • Fecal microbiota transplantation for prevention of transmission of multidrug-resistant organisms – Stephan Harbarth, MD, MS, Geneva University Hospitals

Learning Objectives:

  1. Examine new avenues with which infectious diseases and their transmission can be controlled.
  2. Review how advances in microbial ecology can support both therapeutics and infection control.
  3. Discuss the advantages and challenges of incorporating microbial communities into patient care.

Decennial at ICPIC 2021

ICPIC is delighted to collaborate with Decennial and will be featuring a selection of sessions from the original Decennial program.

After the challenging past year through the COVID-19 pandemic, the need to bring together the global IPC community becomes even stronger. We invite you to attend the 6th edition of ICPIC to be held from 14 to 17 September in Geneva. The conference will address the most influential work in antibiotic stewardship over the past 10 years, minimum requirements for IPC in low resources settings, controversies around isolation precautions, and many more hot topics through keynote lectures, symposia and meet the expert sessions.

Conscious of the challenges for some colleagues to travel to Geneva, there will be an opportunity to also connect with us virtually for selected sessions.